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Course Summary:

Date Details Due

Course Syllabus

Course Syllabus
Course Description This course examines and evaluates theories and arguments concerning ethics and moral reasoning from a philosophical perspective. By engaging with historical and contemporary sources, students will analyze theories about the meaning, nature, and justification of ethical concepts; determine and assess how different forms of moral reasoning apply to contemporary moral issues; become more reflective and informed about their own moral beliefs; and develop their capacity for critical practical reasoning.

Course Design In this course, students will be introduced to ethics as a philosophical discipline, different ethical theories, and practical ethical issues. As the course begins, students will learn about the key features of philosophical ethics and moral reasoning and the importance of studying them, as well as the challenges of egoism and relativism. Students will choose a major contemporary moral question and, as the course progresses, apply the ethical theories to defend a position on that question. During Weeks 2, 3, and 4 respectively, students will examine the form, applications, strengths, and weaknesses of utilitarianism, deontology, and virtue ethics. While learning about the ethical theories, students will draw on these theories in discussing various current events and/or moral dilemmas. Throughout the course, students will consider the background and arguments on various sides of a major contemporary moral problem in the course of writing about that problem.

Course Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
  1. Define the nature and scope of morality and ethics.
  2. Differentiate among traditional ethical theories.
  3. Interpret philosophical thought through critical thinking.
  4. Apply the concepts of ethical and moral reasoning to contemporary issues.
  5. Determine their own ethical perspectives through personal reflection.

Course Map The course map illustrates the careful design of the course through which each learning objective is supported by one or more specific learning activities in order to create integrity and pedagogical depth in the learning experience.

LEARNING OUTCOME
WEEK
ASSIGNMENT
1. Define the nature and scope of morality and ethics. 1
1
1
1
2
3
3
4
5
5
  • Post Your Introduction – Discussion
  • Week 1 Discussion – Discussion
  • Week 1 Quiz – Quiz
  • Ethical Questions – Assignment
  • Week 2 Quiz – Quiz
  • Week 3 Quiz – Quiz
  • Applying the Ethical Theory – Assignment
  • Week 4 Quiz – Quiz
  • Final Exam – Final Exam
  • Ethical Reasoning – Final Paper
2. Differentiate among traditional ethical theories. 1
2
3
3
4
5
5
  • Week 1 Quiz – Quiz
  • Week 2 Quiz – Quiz
  • Week 3 Quiz – Quiz
  • Applying an Ethical Theory – Assignment
  • Week 4 Quiz – Quiz
  • Final Exam – Final Exam
  • Ethical Reasoning – Final Paper
3. Interpret philosophical thought through critical thinking. 1
1
2
2
3
3
3
4
4
5
5
  • Post Your Introduction – Discussion
  • Week 1 Discussion – Discussion
  • Week 2 Discussion – Discussion
  • Week 2 Symposium – Discussion
  • Week 3 Discussion – Discussion
  • Week 3 Symposium – Discussion
  • Applying an Ethical Theory – Assignment
  • Week 4 Discussion – Discussion
  • Week 4 Symposium – Discussion
  • Week 5 Discussion – Discussion
  • Ethical Reasoning – Final Paper
4. Apply the concepts of ethical and moral reasoning to contemporary issues. 1
1
1
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
5
5
5
  • Week 1 Discussion – Discussion
  • Week 1 Quiz – Quiz
  • Ethical Questions – Assignment
  • Week 2 Discussion – Discussion
  • Week 2 Symposium – Discussion
  • Week 2 Quiz – Quiz
  • Week 3 Discussion – Discussion
  • Week 3 Symposium – Discussion
  • Week 3 Quiz – Quiz
  • Applying an Ethical Theory – Assignment
  • Week 4 Discussion – Discussion
  • Week 4 Symposium – Discussion
  • Week 4 Quiz – Quiz
  • Ethics in the Community – Discussion
  • Final Exam – Final Exam
  • Ethical Reasoning – Final Paper
5. Determine one’s own ethical perspectives through personal reflection. 1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
  • Week 1 Discussion – Discussion
  • Ethical Questions – Assignment
  • Week 2 Discussion – Discussion
  • Week 2 Symposium – Discussion
  • Week 3 Discussion – Discussion
  • Week 3 Symposium – Discussion
  • Week 4 Discussion – Discussion
  • Week 4 Symposium – Discussion
  • Ethics in the Community – Discussion
  • Ethical Reasoning – Final Paper

Undergraduate Institutional Outcomes
Ashford University Bachelor Program Graduates:
  1. Synthesize theories and approaches from the subject areas of the general education curriculum to address complex problems.
    1. Utilize interdisciplinary approaches and informed decision-making when solving problems.
    2. Frame problems and construct solutions through reasoned analysis, including consideration of diverse views.
    3. Analyze and present a reasoned response to problems within a wider societal and systems context.
    4. Articulate commonalities and differences across varying cultural, economic, and geographic populations as part of global citizenship.
    5. Demonstrate critical thinking and problem solving skills using adaptable, flexible, creative, and innovative approaches.
  2. Integrate skills from the general education competencies when interpreting ideas and arguments in order to respond to civic, societal, environmental, and economic challenges.
    1. Apply the principles of critical thinking to contemporary issues.
    2. Exhibit clear, sustained, and coherent arguments and narratives in written and oral communication.
    3. Utilize information, media, and technology literacy skills appropriate for an associates or bachelor degree level, by recognizing when information is needed and effectively locating, evaluating, and using the information.
    4. Construct solutions to problems through qualitative or quantitative analysis and/or computational skills and practices.
    5. Display leadership and interdisciplinary teamwork skills.
    6. Employ the skills necessary to engage in lifelong learning through intellectual inquiry.
  3. Synthesize proficiencies appropriate to the degree level and discipline or major.
    1. Explain field specific concepts, theories, and practices.
    2. Evaluate complex problems or challenges related to the field by applying field specific concepts, theories, and practices.
  4. Construct ethical responses to contemporary issues.
    1. Identify and address key ethical issues, including the application of academic knowledge to the concerns of society.
    2. Articulate the constraints that ethical theories and principles place on responses to specific challenges.

Mission Statement The mission of Ashford University is to provide high-quality, accessible, affordable, innovative, educational programs that meet the diverse needs of individuals pursuing advancement in their lives, professions, and communities.

Week 1 – Discussion

31 unread replies. 112 replies.

Your initial discussion thread is due on Day 3 (Thursday) and you have until Day 7 (Monday) to respond to your classmates. Your grade will reflect both the quality of your initial post and the depth of your responses. Refer to the Discussion Forum Grading Rubric under the Settings icon above for guidance on how your discussion will be evaluated.

Week 1 Discussion [WLOs: 1, 2, 3] [CLOs: 1, 3, 4, 5]<

Post on at least three separate days. This week you will have one discussion focused on the challenges of egoism and/or relativism discussed in Chapter 2 of the textbook. Your instructor will be choosing the discussion question and posting it as the first post in the discussion forum. The requirements for the discussion this week include the following:

  • You must begin posting by Day 3 (Thursday).
  • You must post a minimum of four separate posts on at least three separate days (e.g., Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday, or Thursday, Friday, and Sunday, or Thursday, Saturday, and Monday, etc.).
  • The total combined word count for all of your posts, counted together, should be at least 600 words, not including references.
  • You must answer all the questions in the prompt and show evidence of having read the resources that are required to complete the discussion properly (such as by using quotes, referring to specific points made in the text, etc.).
  • In order to satisfy the posting requirements for the week, posts must be made by Day 7 (Monday); posts made after Day 7 are welcome but will not count toward the requirements.
  • Be sure to reply to your classmates and instructor. You are encouraged to read posts your instructor makes (even if they are not in response to your own post), and reply to those as a way of examining the ideas in greater depth.
  • All postings (including replies to peers) are expected to be thought out, proofread for mechanical, grammatical, and spelling accuracy, and to advance the discussion in an intelligent and meaningful way (i.e., saying something like “I really enjoyed what you had to say” will not count). You are also encouraged to do outside research and quote from that as well.
  • For more information, please read the  download .

This discussion will be assessed on a 10-point scale and is worth 4% of your final grade.

Week 2 – Discussion 1

18 unread replies. 110 replies.

Your initial discussion thread is due on Day 3 (Thursday) and you have until Day 7 (Monday) to respond to your classmates. Your grade will reflect both the quality of your initial post and the depth of your responses. Refer to the Discussion Forum Grading Rubric under the Settings icon above for guidance on how your discussion will be evaluated.

Week 2 Discussion [WLOs: 1, 2, 3] [CLOs: 3, 4, 5]<

Post on at least three separate days. This week our main discussion will focus on explaining and evaluating the utilitarian ethical theory as discussed in Chapter 3 of the textbook. Your instructor will be choosing the discussion question and posting it as the first post in the main discussion forum. The requirements for the discussion this week include the following:

  • You must begin posting by Day 3 (Thursday).
  • You must post a minimum of four separate posts on at least three separate days (e.g., Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday, or Thursday, Friday, and Sunday, or Thursday, Saturday, and Monday, etc.).
  • The total combined word count for all of your posts, counted together, should be at least 600 words, not including references.
  • You must answer all the questions in the prompt and show evidence of having read the resources that are required to complete the discussion properly (such as by using quotes, referring to specific points made in the text, etc.).
  • In order to satisfy the posting requirements for the week, posts must be made by Day 7 (Monday); posts made after Day 7 are welcome but will not count toward the requirements.
  • Be sure to reply to your classmates and instructor. You are encouraged to read posts your instructor makes (even if they are not in response to your own post) and reply to those as a way of examining the ideas in greater depth.
  • All postings (including replies to peers) are expected to be thought out, proofread for mechanical, grammatical, and spelling accuracy, and to advance the discussion in an intelligent and meaningful way (i.e., saying something like “I really enjoyed what you had to say” will not count). You are also encouraged to do outside research and quote from that as well.
  • For more information, please read the

Week 2 – Discussion 2

4 unread replies. 88 replies.

Your initial discussion thread is due on Day 3 (Thursday) and you have until Day 7 (Monday) to respond to your classmates. Your grade will reflect both the quality of your initial post and the depth of your responses. Refer to the Discussion Forum Grading Rubric under the Settings icon above for guidance on how your discussion will be evaluated.

Week 2 Symposium [WLOs: 2, 3] [CLOs: 3, 4, 5]<

If you are having trouble starting this video, please access it here (Links to an external site.).
Video transcript can be accessed download .

In the Ancient Greek world (the world of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, often regarded as the birthplace of philosophy) a “symposium” was a banquet held after a meal, an “after party” of sorts that usually included drinking, dancing, recitals, and engaging conversations on the topics of the day.

For our purposes in this course, the Symposium discussions will not involve dancing, recitals, or a banquet, but they will provide food for thought on current ethical issues and direct application of the ethical theory discussed in each of these weeks.

It is almost impossible these days to turn on the news or log onto social media without encountering a controversy that cries out for ethical discussion. For these Symposium discussions, your instructor will choose a topic of current ethical interest and a resource associated with it for you to read or watch. Your task is to consider how the ethical theory of the week might be used to examine, understand, or evaluate the issue.

This week, you will consider how utilitarianism applies to a controversy, dilemma, event, or scenario selected by your instructor. It is a chance for you to discuss together the ethical issues and questions that it raises, your own response to those, and whether that aligns with or does not align with a utilitarian approach. The aim is not to simply assert your own view or to denigrate other views, but to identify, evaluate, and discuss the moral reasoning involved in addressing the chosen issue.

Your posts should remain focused on the ethical considerations, and at some point in your contribution you must specifically address the way a utilitarian would approach this issue by explaining and evaluating that approach.

If you have a position, you should strive to provide reasons in defense of that position.

When responding to peers, you should strive to first understand the reasons they are offering before challenging or critiquing those reasons. One good way of doing this is by summarizing their argument before offering a critique or evaluation.

You must post on at least two separate days, must include at least one substantial reply to a peer or to your instructor, and your posts should add up to at least 400 words.

Your instructor may include additional requirements, so be sure to pay attention to the prompt.

This discussion will be assessed on a 10-point scale and is worth 3% of your final grade.

Week 3 – Discussion 1

15 unread replies. 100 replies.

Your initial discussion thread is due on Day 3 (Thursday) and you have until Day 7 (Monday) to respond to your classmates. Your grade will reflect both the quality of your initial post and the depth of your responses. Refer to the Discussion Forum Grading Rubric under the Settings icon above for guidance on how your discussion will be evaluated.

Week 3 Discussion [WLOs: 1, 2, 3] [CLOs: 3, 4, 5]<

Post on at least three separate days. This week our main discussion will focus on explaining and evaluating the deontological ethical theory as discussed in Chapter 4 of the textbook. Your instructor will be choosing the discussion question and posting it as the first post in the main discussion forum. The requirements for the discussion this week include the following:

  • You must begin posting by Day 3 (Thursday).
  • You must post a minimum of four separate posts on at least three separate days (e.g., Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday, or Thursday, Friday, and Sunday, or Thursday, Saturday, and Monday, etc.).
  • The total combined word count for all of your posts, counted together, should be at least 600 words, not including references.
  • You must answer all the questions in the prompt and show evidence of having read the resources that are required to complete the discussion properly (such as by using quotes, referring to specific points made in the text, etc.).
  • In order to satisfy the posting requirements for the week, posts must be made by Day 7 (Monday); posts made after Day 7 are welcome but will not count toward the requirements.
  • Be sure to reply to your classmates and instructor. You are encouraged to read posts your instructor makes (even if they are not in response to your own post) and reply to those as a way of examining the ideas in greater depth.
  • All postings (including replies to peers) are expected to be thought out, proofread for mechanical, grammatical, and spelling accuracy, and to advance the discussion in an intelligent and meaningful way (i.e., saying something like “I really enjoyed what you had to say” will not count). You are also encouraged to do outside research and quote from that as well.
  • For more information, please read the

Week 3 – Discussion 2

21 unread replies. 66 replies.

Your initial discussion thread is due on Day 3 (Thursday) and you have until Day 7 (Monday) to respond to your classmates. Your grade will reflect both the quality of your initial post and the depth of your responses. Refer to the Discussion Forum Grading Rubric under the Settings icon above for guidance on how your discussion will be evaluated.

Week 3 Symposium [WLOs: 2, 3] [CLOs: 3, 4, 5]

If you are having trouble starting this video, please access it here (Links to an external site.).
Video transcript can be accessed download .

In the Ancient Greek world (the world of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, often regarded as the birthplace of philosophy) a “symposium” was a banquet held after a meal, an “after party” of sorts that usually included drinking, dancing, recitals and engaging conversations on the topics of the day.

For our purposes in this course, the Symposium discussions will not involve dancing, recitals or a banquet, but they will provide food for thought on current ethical issues and direct application of the ethical theory discussed in each of these weeks.

It is almost impossible these days to turn on the news or log onto social media without encountering a controversy that cries out for ethical discussion. For these Symposium discussions, your instructor will choose a topic of current ethical interest and a resource associated with it for you to read or watch. Your task is to consider how the ethical theory of the week might be used to examine, understand or evaluate the issue.

This week, you will consider how deontology applies to a controversy, dilemma, event, or scenario selected by your instructor. It is a chance for you to discuss together the ethical issues and questions that it raises, your own response to those, and whether that aligns with or does not align with a deontological approach. The aim is not to simply assert your own view or to denigrate other views, but to identify, evaluate, and discuss the moral reasoning involved in addressing the chosen issue.

Your posts should remain focused on the ethical considerations, and at some point in your contribution you must specifically address the way someone with a deontological view would approach this issue by explaining and evaluating that approach.

If you have a position, you should strive to provide reasons in defense of that position.

When responding to peers, you should strive to first understand the reasons they are offering before challenging or critiquing those reasons. One good way of doing this is by summarizing their argument before offering a critique or evaluation.

You must post on at least two separate days, must include at least one substantial reply to a peer or to your instructor, and your posts should add up to at least 400 words.

Your instructor may include additional requirements, so be sure to pay attention to the prompt.

Week 4 – Discussion 1

33 unread replies. 87 replies.

Your initial discussion thread is due on Day 3 (Thursday) and you have until Day 7 (Monday) to respond to your classmates. Your grade will reflect both the quality of your initial post and the depth of your responses. Refer to the Discussion Forum Grading Rubric under the Settings icon above for guidance on how your discussion will be evaluated.

Week 4 Discussion [WLOs: 1, 2, 3] [CLOs: 3, 4, 5]<

This week our main discussion will focus on explaining and evaluating the theory of virtue ethics as discussed in Chapter 5 of the textbook. Your instructor will be choosing the discussion question and posting it as the first post in the main discussion forum. The requirements for the discussion this week include the following:

  • You must begin posting by Day 3 (Thursday).
  • You must post a minimum of four separate posts on at least three separate days (e.g., Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday, or Thursday, Friday, and Sunday, or Thursday, Saturday, and Monday, etc.).
  • The total combined word count for all of your posts, counted together, should be at least 600 words, not including references.
  • You must answer all the questions in the prompt and show evidence of having read the resources that are required to complete the discussion properly (such as by using quotes, referring to specific points made in the text, etc.).
  • In order to satisfy the posting requirements for the week, posts must be made by Day 7 (Monday); posts made after Day 7 are welcome but will not count toward the requirements.
  • Be sure to reply to your classmates and instructor. You are encouraged to read posts your instructor makes (even if they are not in response to your own post) and reply to those as a way of examining the ideas in greater depth.
  • All postings (including replies to peers) are expected to be thought out, proofread for mechanical, grammatical, and spelling accuracy, and to advance the discussion in an intelligent and meaningful way (i.e., saying something like “I really enjoyed what you had to say” will not count). You are also encouraged to do outside research and quote from that as well.

For more information, please read the

Week 4 – Discussion 2

27 unread replies. 76 replies.

Your initial discussion thread is due on Day 3 (Thursday) and you have until Day 7 (Monday) to respond to your classmates. Your grade will reflect both the quality of your initial post and the depth of your responses. Refer to the Discussion Forum Grading Rubric under the Settings icon above for guidance on how your discussion will be evaluated.

Week 4 Symposium [WLOs: 2, 3] [CLOs: 3, 4, 5]<

If you are having trouble starting this video, please access it here (Links to an external site.).
Video transcript can be accessed download .

In the Ancient Greek world (the world of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, often regarded as the birthplace of philosophy) a “symposium” was a banquet held after a meal, an “after party” of sorts that usually included drinking, dancing, recitals and engaging conversations on the topics of the day.

For our purposes in this course, the Symposium discussions will not involve dancing, recitals or a banquet, but they will provide food for thought on current ethical issues and direct application of the ethical theory discussed in each of these weeks.

It is almost impossible these days to turn on the news or log onto social media without encountering a controversy that cries out for ethical discussion. For these Symposium discussions, your instructor will choose a topic of current ethical interest and a resource associated with it for you to read or watch. Your task is to consider how the ethical theory of the week might be used to examine, understand or evaluate the issue.

This week, you will consider how virtue ethics applies to a controversy, dilemma, event, or scenario selected by your instructor. It is a chance for you to discuss together the ethical issues and questions that it raises, your own response to those, and whether that aligns with or does not align with a virtue ethics approach. The aim is not to simply assert your own view or to denigrate other views, but to identify, evaluate, and discuss the moral reasoning involved in addressing the chosen issue.

Your posts should remain focused on the ethical considerations, and at some point in your contribution you must specifically address the way a virtue ethicist would approach this issue by explaining and evaluating that approach.

If you have a position, you should strive to provide reasons in defense of that position.

When responding to peers, you should strive to first understand the reasons they are offering before challenging or critiquing those reasons. One good way of doing this is by summarizing their argument before offering a critique or evaluation.

You must post on at least two separate days, must include at least one substantial reply to a peer or to your instructor, and your posts should add up to at least 400 words.

Your instructor may include additional requirements, so be sure to pay attention to the prompt.

This discussion will be assessed on a 10-point scale and is worth 3% of your final grade.

Week 5 – Discussion

31 unread replies. 86 replies.

Your initial discussion thread is due on Day 3 (Thursday) and you have until Day 7 (Monday) to respond to your classmates. Your grade will reflect both the quality of your initial post and the depth of your responses. Refer to the Discussion Forum Grading Rubric under the Settings icon above for guidance on how your discussion will be evaluated.

Ethics in the Community [WLOs: 1, 2] [CLOs: 3, 4, 5]<

Post on at least three separate days. There is only one discussion this week. The prompt is below the list of requirements. The requirements for the discussion this week include the following:

  • You must begin posting by Day 3 (Thursday).
  • You must post a minimum of four separate posts on at least three separate days (e.g., Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday, or Thursday, Friday, and Sunday, or Thursday, Saturday, and Monday, etc.).
  • The total combined word count for all of your posts, counted together, should be at least 600 words, not including references.
  • You must answer all the questions in the prompt and show evidence of having read the resources that are required to complete the discussion properly (such as by using quotes, referring to specific points made in the text, etc.).
  • In order to satisfy the posting requirements for the week, posts must be made by Day 7 (Monday); posts made after Day 7 are welcome but will not count toward the requirements.
  • Be sure to reply to your classmates and instructor. You are encouraged to read posts your instructor makes (even if they are not in response to your own post), and reply to those as a way of examining the ideas in greater depth.
  • All postings (including replies to peers) are expected to be thought out, proofread for mechanical, grammatical, and spelling accuracy, and to advance the discussion in an intelligent and meaningful way (i.e., saying something like “I really enjoyed what you had to say” will not count). You are also encouraged to do outside research and quote from that as well.
  • For more information, please read the download .

Discussion: Ethics in the Community

In Chapter 1 of your text, you saw how moral reasoning involves moving back and forth between general, abstract ideas like principles and values and particular concrete judgments about what is good or right, and seeking to find a kind of agreement or equilibrium between those.

In Chapters 3, 4, and 5, you were introduced to utilitarianism, deontology, and virtue ethics. Each of these ethical theories represents different ways of reasoning about ethical questions, based in different account of the principles, values, and other conceptions that inform the “abstract” side of the dialectic.

In this course, and in much of life, the “concrete” ethical issues that receive the most attention are frequently those that elicit passionate responses and widespread debate, affect large numbers of people, involve matters of deep significance like life and death or fundamental rights, and so on. However, as important as these issues are, there is often a limit to how much impact most individuals can have on such matters; instead, the place where ethics and moral reasoning have their greatest impact is in one’s local community. Thus, in this final discussion board, you will demonstrate your grasp of the relation between the abstract ideas in one of these theories and a concrete ethical issue or social problem in your local community.

  • Engage the community:
    • Begin by finding an ethical issue or social problem that currently impacts or has recently impacted your local or regional community (such as your neighborhood, town or city, county, school district, religious community, or something of similar scope to any of these).
    • Briefly summarize the issue or problem, and provide a link to a news article, video, or some other resource that documents the issue or problem so that your fellow students can learn more about it when formulating their responses to you.
  • Apply the theory:
    • Next, choose one of the ethical theories and discuss how the moral reasoning of the theory might be used to address or resolve the issue or problem.
  • Evaluate the reasoning:
    • In evaluating the application of the moral theory you may, for example, consider one or more questions like:
      • Does this differ from the way this issue is currently being addressed?
      • Does it present a better response than another ethical approach would?
      • Does the theory present an adequate response to the issue, or does it leave significant aspects of the issue unresolved?
      • Does applying the theory to this issue raise other problems or concerns?
      • In light of this issue, are there ways the principles or values of the theory might need to be modified from the form that we studied in class?
  • Discuss with your peers:
    • Respond to  your fellow students’ posts by evaluating the extent to which you think the ethical theory helps to resolve the issue or problem, or by considering how a different ethical theory might address the problem or issue.

Description

(FULL CLASS SOLVED) PHI208: Ethics and Moral Reasoning (ACQ2044B) ASHFORD UNI

Course Summary:

Date Details Due

Course Syllabus

Course Syllabus
Course Description This course examines and evaluates theories and arguments concerning ethics and moral reasoning from a philosophical perspective. By engaging with historical and contemporary sources, students will analyze theories about the meaning, nature, and justification of ethical concepts; determine and assess how different forms of moral reasoning apply to contemporary moral issues; become more reflective and informed about their own moral beliefs; and develop their capacity for critical practical reasoning.

Course Design In this course, students will be introduced to ethics as a philosophical discipline, different ethical theories, and practical ethical issues. As the course begins, students will learn about the key features of philosophical ethics and moral reasoning and the importance of studying them, as well as the challenges of egoism and relativism. Students will choose a major contemporary moral question and, as the course progresses, apply the ethical theories to defend a position on that question. During Weeks 2, 3, and 4 respectively, students will examine the form, applications, strengths, and weaknesses of utilitarianism, deontology, and virtue ethics. While learning about the ethical theories, students will draw on these theories in discussing various current events and/or moral dilemmas. Throughout the course, students will consider the background and arguments on various sides of a major contemporary moral problem in the course of writing about that problem.

Course Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
  1. Define the nature and scope of morality and ethics.
  2. Differentiate among traditional ethical theories.
  3. Interpret philosophical thought through critical thinking.
  4. Apply the concepts of ethical and moral reasoning to contemporary issues.
  5. Determine their own ethical perspectives through personal reflection.

Course Map The course map illustrates the careful design of the course through which each learning objective is supported by one or more specific learning activities in order to create integrity and pedagogical depth in the learning experience.

LEARNING OUTCOME
WEEK
ASSIGNMENT
1. Define the nature and scope of morality and ethics. 1
1
1
1
2
3
3
4
5
5
  • Post Your Introduction – Discussion
  • Week 1 Discussion – Discussion
  • Week 1 Quiz – Quiz
  • Ethical Questions – Assignment
  • Week 2 Quiz – Quiz
  • Week 3 Quiz – Quiz
  • Applying the Ethical Theory – Assignment
  • Week 4 Quiz – Quiz
  • Final Exam – Final Exam
  • Ethical Reasoning – Final Paper
2. Differentiate among traditional ethical theories. 1
2
3
3
4
5
5
  • Week 1 Quiz – Quiz
  • Week 2 Quiz – Quiz
  • Week 3 Quiz – Quiz
  • Applying an Ethical Theory – Assignment
  • Week 4 Quiz – Quiz
  • Final Exam – Final Exam
  • Ethical Reasoning – Final Paper
3. Interpret philosophical thought through critical thinking. 1
1
2
2
3
3
3
4
4
5
5
  • Post Your Introduction – Discussion
  • Week 1 Discussion – Discussion
  • Week 2 Discussion – Discussion
  • Week 2 Symposium – Discussion
  • Week 3 Discussion – Discussion
  • Week 3 Symposium – Discussion
  • Applying an Ethical Theory – Assignment
  • Week 4 Discussion – Discussion
  • Week 4 Symposium – Discussion
  • Week 5 Discussion – Discussion
  • Ethical Reasoning – Final Paper
4. Apply the concepts of ethical and moral reasoning to contemporary issues. 1
1
1
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
5
5
5
  • Week 1 Discussion – Discussion
  • Week 1 Quiz – Quiz
  • Ethical Questions – Assignment
  • Week 2 Discussion – Discussion
  • Week 2 Symposium – Discussion
  • Week 2 Quiz – Quiz
  • Week 3 Discussion – Discussion
  • Week 3 Symposium – Discussion
  • Week 3 Quiz – Quiz
  • Applying an Ethical Theory – Assignment
  • Week 4 Discussion – Discussion
  • Week 4 Symposium – Discussion
  • Week 4 Quiz – Quiz
  • Ethics in the Community – Discussion
  • Final Exam – Final Exam
  • Ethical Reasoning – Final Paper
5. Determine one’s own ethical perspectives through personal reflection. 1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
  • Week 1 Discussion – Discussion
  • Ethical Questions – Assignment
  • Week 2 Discussion – Discussion
  • Week 2 Symposium – Discussion
  • Week 3 Discussion – Discussion
  • Week 3 Symposium – Discussion
  • Week 4 Discussion – Discussion
  • Week 4 Symposium – Discussion
  • Ethics in the Community – Discussion
  • Ethical Reasoning – Final Paper

Undergraduate Institutional Outcomes
Ashford University Bachelor Program Graduates:
  1. Synthesize theories and approaches from the subject areas of the general education curriculum to address complex problems.
    1. Utilize interdisciplinary approaches and informed decision-making when solving problems.
    2. Frame problems and construct solutions through reasoned analysis, including consideration of diverse views.
    3. Analyze and present a reasoned response to problems within a wider societal and systems context.
    4. Articulate commonalities and differences across varying cultural, economic, and geographic populations as part of global citizenship.
    5. Demonstrate critical thinking and problem solving skills using adaptable, flexible, creative, and innovative approaches.
  2. Integrate skills from the general education competencies when interpreting ideas and arguments in order to respond to civic, societal, environmental, and economic challenges.
    1. Apply the principles of critical thinking to contemporary issues.
    2. Exhibit clear, sustained, and coherent arguments and narratives in written and oral communication.
    3. Utilize information, media, and technology literacy skills appropriate for an associates or bachelor degree level, by recognizing when information is needed and effectively locating, evaluating, and using the information.
    4. Construct solutions to problems through qualitative or quantitative analysis and/or computational skills and practices.
    5. Display leadership and interdisciplinary teamwork skills.
    6. Employ the skills necessary to engage in lifelong learning through intellectual inquiry.
  3. Synthesize proficiencies appropriate to the degree level and discipline or major.
    1. Explain field specific concepts, theories, and practices.
    2. Evaluate complex problems or challenges related to the field by applying field specific concepts, theories, and practices.
  4. Construct ethical responses to contemporary issues.
    1. Identify and address key ethical issues, including the application of academic knowledge to the concerns of society.
    2. Articulate the constraints that ethical theories and principles place on responses to specific challenges.

Mission Statement The mission of Ashford University is to provide high-quality, accessible, affordable, innovative, educational programs that meet the diverse needs of individuals pursuing advancement in their lives, professions, and communities.
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